About This Image

Provenance: photographer to Vogue; collection of Dr. Agha, Vogue's art director.

Edward G. Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was a Romanian-born American actor. A popular star on stage and screen during Hollywood's Golden Age, he appeared in 40 Broadway plays and more than 100 films during a 50-year career. He is best remembered for his tough-guy roles as a gangster, such as his star-making films, Little Caesar and Key Largo.

During the 1930s and 1940s, he was an outspoken public critic of fascism and Nazism, which were first growing in strength in Europe and led up to World War II. His activism included contributing over $250,000 to more than 850 organizations involved in war relief, along with cultural, educational and religious groups. During the 1950s, he was called to testify at the House Un-American Activities Committee during the Red Scare, but was cleared of any Communist involvement after naming names of Communist sympathizers (Albert Maltz, Dalton Trumbo, John Howard Lawson, Frank Tuttle, and Sidney Buchman) and repudiated some of the organizations he had belonged to in the 1930s and 1940s.

Robinson was never nominated for an Academy Award, but in 1973 he was awarded an honorary Oscar in recognition that he had "achieved greatness as a player, a patron of the arts and a dedicated citizen...in sum, a Renaissance man".

Anton Bruehl (1900-1982) studied engineering at the Christian Brothers School in Melbourne before emigrating to the United States in 1919 to accept a job with Western Electric. An exhibition of photographs at the Clarence H. White School in New York inspired him to give up engineering for photography. He enrolled in White's school in 1924-25, and soon became a teaching assistant for White in New York and Canaan, CT.

After Vogue published his photographs in 1926, Bruehl dedicated himself to freelance commercial photography by establishing a New York studio, which was active from 1927 through 1966. His photographs appeared in Vogue, Vanity Fair, and other prominent publications, and his work was shown in major international exhibitions, such as Film und Foto at the Deutscher Werkbund in Stuttgart (1929) and Photography 1839-1937 at the Museum of Modern Art. His best-known body of work produced outside the studio was published as Mexico (1933), a book of black-and-white photographs of life and people in Mexican towns.

Bruehl is noted for the color photography he produced in the 1930s for Condé Nast, which at that time had a virtual monopoly on the color printing process. Fernand Bourges, a color technician at Condé Nast Engravers, developed a four-color separation transparency process in 1932 that allowed the company to print color images in its publications on a regular basis. This collaboration--Bruehl's color photographs, Bourges' color transparencies, Condé Nast's printing--accounted for the majority of color images that appeared in print in the mid-1930s. Besides his innovative color photography, Bruehl was recognized for his stylish advertising still lifes, and for the celebrity portraiture and fashion photography he did for Vogue during the 1930s.

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Actor Edward G. Robinson
Anton Bruehl Actor Edward G. Robinson

Price $4,000

Main Image
Description

Ref.# 15776

Medium Silver print

Mount on original mount

Photo Date 1920s  Print Date 1920s

Dimensions 9-3/4 x 7-5/8 in. (248 x 194 mm)

Photo Country United States (USA)

Photographer Country United States (USA)

Contact

Alex Novak and Marthe Smith

Email info@vintageworks.net

Phone +1-215-822-5662

Company
Contemporary Works / Vintage Works, Ltd.

 

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